Shouldn’t You Be in School? by Lemony Snicket

schoolA new book from my favorite person! This is the third book in the All the Wrong Questions series. If you have already read #1 and 2, follow up with this one, but read carefully. Strange things are happening. Well, you know, stranger than usual. And while this book is just as clever as the last two, it feels much heavier. Much more dismaying, a word here which means the book takes us to several different locations around Stain’d-by-the-Sea but doesn’t bring us much closer to any answers. However, we do have all of our characters in the same place at once and our heroes have banded together in force to prepare for the fight against Hangfire, the villain. What does he want? Why? Is caviar really the salty jewel of the tasty sea? Alas, these questions are probably wrong. Look for some serious references to A Series of Unfortunate Events in this book! You will find them quite pleasing.

This book JUST came out, so there is no AR info to share. Doesn’t matter. You need to read this and then wait miserably with me until the next one comes out. In the meantime, watch this interview with Daniel Handler–

Then watch this one and follow the trail–

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Twerp by Mark Goldblatt

twerpTwerp is a book that was handed to me by the librarian at my school. At first, I didn’t like it. The characters were pretty much jerks and they just kept making bad decisions. I knew one of my students had also read it and she assured me that I should keep going and eventually it would all come together, so I carried on and she was right. I think my frustration was partly due to the fact that I was having to read it in little bursts and never had a chance to fully engage in the story. I’m still adjusting to being back at school, as I’m sure many of you are, and every time I sat down to read I would start falling asleep! I woke up early today and decided to dedicate some serious time for reading and that made all the difference. If you are having this same type of trouble, maybe it’s best to set your book aside until you can make the time to give it your full attention. It’s hard to do when so many things are new and changing at the beginning of the year.  I usually participate in silent reading with my students, but there have been a lot distractions lately, so I brought the book home and powered right through it.

Kids might have trouble relating to the setting of this book, which takes place in 1969, where kids ran free instead of having their schedule micro-managed all the time, but everyone can relate to this story about finding your own identity in middle school. Twerp is about a sixth grader named Julian Twerski, nicknamed Twerp by his best friend, Lonnie. Lonnie pulls the strings in their group of friends and Julian follows, even when he is not sure that he should. As a result, friendships are tested and betrayals occur. People get hurt in this story, first in a “boys will be boys” kind of way, but then Julian gets the idea for another prank and the boys go along with him again, causing a terrible thing to happen. These kids made me really mad!

As part of his penance, Julian starts writing a journal for his English teacher. (And also to get out of reading Julius Caesar, so he thinks this is a pretty good deal.) Lonnie has a crush on the new girl and asks Julian to write her a letter on his behalf. When Julian passes her the letter, he gets caught in the middle of a misunderstanding. Then he gets talked into another sketchy situation, and he is the one who gets taken advantage of and left behind. I did not feel sympathetic to any of the characters (so many bad choices!) until the end when Julian starts to stand on his own. The only exceptions are Eduardo, an outsider and newcomer to the neighborhood, and Amelia, Julian’s sister, who are the voices of reason for Julian. However, the concept of going along with the group and finding your place is an important one, and deciding when to stand up for the right thing is even more important. You do have to wait until the very end to get to the big story within the story, so stick with it. There were discussion questions included in this edition and the one I loved asked about the journal format of the book and if Julian was a reliable narrator, which is always an interesting thing to consider once you’ve been given the big picture. (Or have you? See, you’ll never really know!)

Twerp reminded me of Because of Mr. Terupt due to its school setting and the fact that you had to wait until the end to find out what really happened. It also had some of Wonder‘s messages about kindness and doing the right thing embedded in it, too. If you liked either of those, you might give this one a try as well!

Twerp has an AR level of  4.5 and is worth 9 points.